What Ohio Residents Need to Know About Obamacare

You must have health insurance, unless you qualify for an exemption.

The Affordable Care Act requires you to enroll in a health insurance plan unless you qualify for an exemption from the law. You will report whether you have coverage — or whether you are exempt — when you file your taxes in April.

For 2015, you can sign up for coverage during the open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015.

You can shop for affordable health care plans at HealthCare.gov.

Residents of Ohio will use the website HealthCare.gov to choose their Obamacare plan, apply for cost-saving subsidies, and get other help they need.

If you are currently uninsured, you can use the state marketplace to compare plans and enroll in a plan that meets your needs.

If you already have health insurance, either as an individual or through your job, you may be able to keep your current plan — or you can use HealthCare.gov to shop for a new one.

You may qualify for subsidies that will save you money.

If your income is very low, you may qualify for free or low-cost coverage through Medicaid in Ohio. You may still qualify for insurance through Medicaid, here’s how.

Number of people in your household

1

2

3

4

5

6

Private Marketplace health plans

You may qualify for lower premiums on a Marketplace insurance plan if your yearly income is between…

See next row if your yearly income is at the lower end of this range.

$11,670 – $46,680

$15,730 – $62,920

$19,790 – $79,160

$23,850 – $95,400

$27,910 – $111,640

$31,970 – $127,880

You may qualify for lower premiums AND lower out-of-pocket costs for Marketplace insurance if your yearly income is between…

$11,670 – $29,175

$15,730 – $39,325

$19,790 – $49,475

$28,850 – $59,625

$27,910 – $69,775

$31,970 – $79,925

Medicaid Coverage

If your state is expanding Medicaid in 2014: You may qualify for Medicaid coverage if your yearly income is below…

$16,105

$21,707

$27,310

$32,913

$38,516

$44,119

If your state isn’t expanding Medicaid: You may not qualify for any Marketplace savings programs if your yearly income is below…

$11,670

$15,730

$19,790

$23,850

$27,910

$31,970

Número de Personas en Su Hogar

1

2

3

4

5

6

Planes de Salud del Mercado Privado

Usted podría calificar para primas más bajas en un plan de seguro del Mercado si su ingreso anual se encuentra entre…

Vea la siguiente fila si su ingreso está en el extremo inferior de este rango.

$11,670 – $46,680

$15,730 – $62,920

$19,790 – $79,160

$23,850 – $95,400

$27,910 – $111,640

$31,970 – $127,880

Usted podría calificar para primas más bajas Y costos de su propio bolsillo más bajos en seguros del Mercado si su ingreso anual se encuentra entre…

$11,670 – $29,175

$15,730 – $39,325

$19,790 – $49,475

$28,850 – $59,625

$27,910 – $69,775

$31,970 – $79,925

Cobertura de Medicaid

Si su estado está expandiendo Medicaid en 2014: Usted podría calificar para cobertura de Medicaid si su ingreso anual es inferior a…

$16,105

$21,707

$27,310

$32,913

$38,516

$44,119

Si su estado no está expandiendo Medicaid: Usted no podrá calificar para ningún programa de ahorros del Mercado si su ingreso anual es inferior a…

$11,670

$15,730

$19,790

$23,850

$27,910

$31,970

If you used HealthCare.gov to enroll for 2014, you may be automatically re-enrolled for 2015 — and that may not be a good thing.

Most people who purchased their 2014 insurance plan from an online marketplace will be able to automatically renew their coverage for 2015. In other words, your insurance will continue even if you do nothing during the open enrollment period from November 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015. That sounds convenient, but automatic renewal exposes you to a number of potential pitfalls.

  • If your insurer decides to cancel your current plan, you could be switched to another plan without warning. The new plan may cost you more or change your eligibility for financial assistance.
  • Automatic re-enrollment could mean you aren’t getting the right subsidy package. This could leave you facing higher monthly premiums now or — if you take more assistance than you’re eligible for — a big tax bill later.
  • You may miss out on a better deal or better coverage if you don’t compare all available plans to your current plan.

While allowing yourself to be automatically re-enrolled is better than going without insurance, it’s best to take advantage of open enrollment. You’ll be able to shop around and evaluate new plans and costs. Even if you decide to stay with the plan you have, you can use open enrollment to confirm your personal information and ensure you’re getting the right amount of financial aid.